In Defense Of The Crusades

This is a guest post by Vincent Law. It was originally published on Atavistic Intelligentsia.

Of all things, why defend the Crusades? Because, there is nothing that undermines Tradition more than historical revisionism. A people dispossessed and ashamed of their own history are susceptible to suggestions from all quarters. You are not the proud descendents of Europe, the conquerors of the known world, the vanguard of christianity, you are just _____ (insert revision here). We know what gets filled into the blanks nowadays: “You are just CIS privileged white oppressors!” If you do not know your own history, what can you say against that? Or what about the claim that Christianity caused the Crusades and the mass killing of non-christians all over the world. “Aren’t you ashamed to be a Christian? How dare you be proud of your heritage of oppression!?”

Think about how few people know about their own history nowadays. This is not a chance happenstance, but part of concerted strategy to make us forget who we are. Sure, your average human ignorance plays a role here, but that is why history has always been a mandatory subject of instruction. An understanding of who you are is inseparable from what came before you, and what you aspire to be. If you don’t know the history of your own faith, you are also susceptible to the venom of those that hate everything your culture stands for, to the mad ravings of a charismatic church pastor even, or the self-flagellation of our ruling SJW Politburo. Existentialist philosopher Sam Keen diagnosed the problem well in his book, To a Dancing God.

“Until recent years the keystone of personal identity was participation in the shared stories, legends, and myths of a tribe, nation, cult or church. The past, present, and future of the individual were bound together by the memories and hopes of a people to which he belonged. With the birth of secular, pluralistic, technological society, a new type of man has emerged– the man without a story, the rootless protean man living without the stability of a tradition which her remembers with pride or a future he awaits with longing.”

So what do we do? How do we recover our sense of being part of something greater, our feeling of belonging, our belief in our own destiny? Its simple, we teach our children their own history. Lets start with the much maligned crusades of the 13th,12th, and 11th centuries. Teach then about how the crusading ideal, aka an alliance between christian princes under the command of religious authority for holy war against infidels, was born not in the 11th century, but in the 9th in the context of Muslim invasions of France and Italy. Tell them about the great battles that Christianity had to fight to maintain its existence in Europe, against invading armies of a foreign religion.

Start with this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ostia

Then show them this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Garigliano

And this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Tourtour

Teach them that for about 500 years, Christianity’s very existence was in peril from Muslim invaders. And that the Crusades, were born out of a need to wage defensive warfare even before it was brought to the Holy Land. Teach them about how Thomas Aquinas basically had to create a just war theory from scratch to justify self-defense of Christianity before the Christian authorities were convinced of the morality of going on Crusade against a religion that was founded by a warlord, on warring ideals, and forcible conquering and conversion of infidels.

Remind them that they are here, that their very culture exists because their ancestors fought for what was theirs, and that when their backs were against the wall, they finally had enough and decided to stake their claim to exist in this world. Tell them that the West owes its very existence to the Crusades. And finally remind them, that fundamentally, absolutely nothing has changed in this world, and that our complacency as a people endangers everything our ancestors spilled blood and spent treasure to build. Or better yet, just show them this: crusades Read More: God Only Knows Why Women Are So Cold

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2 thoughts on “In Defense Of The Crusades

  1. One problem with most people’s understanding of the Crusades is that they don’t know anything about the historical context in which they occurred. Calling the Crusades “holy wars” misses the primary reason for why they were fought in the first place.

    Between 1070-1090, the Turks conquered much of Asia Minor, which was held by the Byzantine Empire. The conquests gradually left the Byzantines vulnerable and financially drained. In response, Emperor Alexios I Komnenos sent a letter to Pope Urban II requesting troops. Instead, the pope called for a Holy Crusade to retake Jerusalem, turning it into a religious conflict. Had he simply sent troops as requested, a campaign would have still been fought, but the religious component and objective wouldn’t have been present.

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